A Brief Talk About Windows Search And Its Basics (Overview)

I am using Windows 8 on my laptop and I love the “Windows Search” capability in it, which is enabled by default. In this post I will briefly talk about the basics of Windows Search.
 
Windows Search is a standard component of Windows 7 and Windows Vista, and is enabled by default. Windows Search replaces Windows Desktop Search (WDS), which was available as an add-in for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. (MSDN)

Windows Search replaces Windows Desktop Search (WDS), which was available as an add-in for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. (MSDN)
The main part of Windows Search is the Windows Search Service (WSS). This service extracts the useful info (properties and values) from the documents in your file system, and organizes them (the extracted meta data) so that results (document properties) can be returned efficiently in response to your search queries.
Highest-level unit of organization in Windows Search is called Catalog. Catolog is a set of indexed documents. It consists of a properties table. Each row in this table corresponds to a seperate document and each column corresponds to a property.
The Indexer Process, which is a windows service, is the one who maintains these Catalogs and indexes in them for Windows Search. You can see Indexer Process running in the Task Manager with the name of “SearchIndexer.exe”.
Search Indexer always runs for all users in the local SYSTEM account as long as your system is not suffering from lack of resources like Ram, CPU, Battery life, Disk space or from high I/O rate.
Windows Search is enabled by default. If you want to disable it simply go to “Control Panel” -> “Programs and Features”, click “Turn Windows features on or off” and deselect “Windows Search” in the “Windows Features” window. (You can also trim down the indexing locations to cut down on the amount of data that you’re indexing instead of turning Windows Search off completely)

The beautiful thing about Windows Search is that it allows you to use Advanced Query Syntax (AQS). More on that in another post.

Hope this helps someone.

Good luck,
Serdar.

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